Link to page: Vaccination against hereditary colorectal cancer successful in mice
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Vaccination against hereditary colorectal cancer successful in mice

Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center and Heidelberg University Hospital have for the first time been able to delay the development of hereditary colorectal cancer with a protective vaccination. Mice with a hereditary predisposition to colorectal cancer survived significantly longer after vaccination than unvaccinated animals. Combining the vaccination with an anti-inflammatory drug increased the protective effect.

Link to page: Patient care in certified cancer centers - longer survival at a lower cost
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Patient care in certified cancer centers - longer survival at a lower cost

Quality assurance in cancer medicine has a reputation for being expensive and involving considerable outlay. For the first time, a cost-effectiveness analysis has now shown that patients treated in certified cancer centers not only survived longer than patients in non-certified hospitals, but also cost less, despite the greater resource commitment required. This was established by health economists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in collaboration with health services researchers from TU Dresden, taking colon cancer as an example. Their study shows that the cost and effort associated with certifying cancer centers is more than offset by the enhanced efficiency of patient care: treating colon cancer patients in certified centers is likely to improve their prognosis without placing any additional economic strain on the health system.

Link to page: Why identical mutations cause different types of cancer
DKTK Munich

Why identical mutations cause different types of cancer

Why do alterations of certain genes cause cancer only in specific organs of the human body? Scientists at the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), the Technical University of Munich (TUM), and the University Medical Center Göttingen have now demonstrated that cells originating from different organs are differentially susceptible to activating mutations in cancer drivers: The same mutation in precursor cells of the pancreas or the bile duct leads to fundamental different outcomes. The team discovered for the first time that tissue specific genetic interactions are responsible for the differential susceptibility of the biliary and the pancreatic epithelium towards transformation by oncogenes. The new findings could guide more precise therapeutic decision making in the future.

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Link to page: Hijacked immune activator promotes growth and spread of colorectal cancer
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Hijacked immune activator promotes growth and spread of colorectal cancer

Through a complex, self-reinforcing feedback mechanism, colorectal cancer cells make room for their own expansion by driving surrounding healthy intestinal cells to death - while simultaneously fueling their own growth. This feedback loop is driven by an activator of the innate immune system. Researchers from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the University of Heidelberg discovered this mechanism in the intestinal tissue of fruit flies.

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Link to page: High-throughput metabolic profiling of single cells
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High-throughput metabolic profiling of single cells

Scientists from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have presented a new method for generating metabolic profiles of individual cells. The method, which combines fluorescence microscopy and a specific form of mass spectroscopy, can analyze over a hundred metabolites and lipids from more than a thousand individual cells per hour. Researchers expect the method to better answer a variety of biomedical questions in the future.

Link to page: Better treatment opportunities for children with cancer in Europe
Hopp Children's Cancer Center

Better treatment opportunities for children with cancer in Europe

Today at the Dutch Embassy in Berlin, in the presence of Queen Máxima of the Netherlands, after whom the Princess Máxima Center for Pediatric Oncology in Utrecht is named, representatives of the Princess Máxima Center for Pediatric Oncology, the Hopp Children's Cancer Center Heidelberg (KiTZ), University Hospital Heidelberg (UKHD) and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) signed a memorandum on strategic cooperation in the field of pediatric oncology in Europe. Children with cancer still do not have the same treatment options as adults, and a fifth of young patients do not survive the disease. The research fund established by the KiTZ and the Princess Máxima Center is intended to boost European pediatric oncology research – to develop therapies with fewer side effects that are specifically tailored to children.

Link to page: DKFZ Innovation Award presented for the first time
Latest News

DKFZ Innovation Award presented for the first time

A novel immunization system allows the generation of protective antibodies against almost any molecule: This achievement by DKFZ researcher Nina Papavasiliou has been honored by the ‚Friends of the German Cancer Research Center' association with the first-ever DKFZ Innovation Award.

Link to page: Blood stem cells make brain tumors more aggressive
DKTK Essen/Düsseldorf

Blood stem cells make brain tumors more aggressive

For the first time, scientists from the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) partner site in Essen/Düsseldorf have discovered stem cells of the hematopoietic system in glioblastomas, the most aggressive form of brain tumor. These hematopoietic stem cells promote division of the cancer cells and at the same time suppress the immune response against the tumor. This surprising discovery might open up new possibilities for developing more effective immunotherapies against these malignant brain tumors.

Cancer in the EU

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