Link to page: How to prevent the spread of tumor cells via the lymph vessels
Metastasis

How to prevent the spread of tumor cells via the lymph vessels

What role do the lymphatic vessels play in the metastasis of cancer cells? Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center and the Mannheim Medical Faculty of the University of Heidelberg developed a method to investigate this question in mice. The aim of the work was to identify new ways to block the dangerous colonization and spread of tumor cells. The researchers discovered that an antibody against a signaling molecule of the vascular system causes the lymphatic vessels in the tumor to die, suppresses metastasis and thus prolongs the survival of the mice. Based on these findings, approaches may be developed to prevent the dangerous spread of tumor cells. The results have now been published in the journal Cancer Discovery.

Link to page: Subtypes with different aggressiveness discovered
Pancreatic cancer

Subtypes with different aggressiveness discovered

Tumors of the pancreas are particularly feared. They are usually discovered late and mortality is high. Until now, no targeted and personalized therapies exist. Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the Heidelberg Institute for Stem Cell Technology and Experimental Medicine* (HI-STEM) have now succeeded for the first time in defining two differently aggressive molecular subtypes of pancreatic carcinoma. This provides new insights into the origin of the tumors. In the more aggressive group of tumors, a phenomenon known as "viral mimicry" leads to a cancer-promoting inflammatory reaction. This could possibly be the basis for the development of a targeted, subtype-oriented therapy. The results have now been published in the journal Cancer Discovery.

Link to page: Biosafety at the DKFZ
Current Topic

Biosafety at the DKFZ

Daily work routine of our more than 1,300 scientists at the DKFZ for the most part takes place in laboratories with different safety levels. Biological safety levels (at DKFZ: BSL1-BSL3) are based on the risk classification of the biological (or biomedical) work carried out. Each laboratory is designed around the safety level of its research, including the laboratory equipment, the specific working practices, and the typical protective equipment worn.

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Link to page: Human Papilloma Viruses: Antibody Status as a Cancer Warning
Latest News

Human Papilloma Viruses: Antibody Status as a Cancer Warning

Human papilloma viruses (HPV) can cause various tumor diseases, including cancer of the throat. Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ) in Heidelberg are now providing evidence that antibodies against certain viral proteins could be an early warning sign of an increased risk of developing throat cancer.

Link to page: Vaccination against altered proteins could prevent cancer development
Latest News

Vaccination against altered proteins could prevent cancer development

Cancer types in which a defect in genetic repair is given are characterized by a particularly high number of mutations. Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg University Hospital, the University of Heidelberg and the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) have now succeeded in identifying mutations in these tumors that are identical in numerous patients and which also lead to altered protein structures. Vaccinations against these altered proteins could in future prevent the development of these forms of cancer if they are proven in clinical studies.

Link to page: September – International Childhood Cancer Awareness Month: New hope for cancer relapse cases
Latest News

September – International Childhood Cancer Awareness Month: New hope for cancer relapse cases

Around 2,000 children in Germany are diagnosed with cancer every year. The chances of recovery are now good, but if the cancer comes back, the treatment options for children still lag significantly behind the treatments available for adults. Dedicated childhood cancer drugs have been rare until now. At the conference on Improving Cancer Care in Europe, held at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Olaf Witt, Director of the Hopp Children's Cancer Center Heidelberg (KiTZ), explained the options currently available to pediatric oncology researchers to help these young patients.

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Link to page: Two ERC Starting Grants to DKFZ junior scientists
Funding

Two ERC Starting Grants to DKFZ junior scientists

The European Research Council (ERC) grants are considered a particularly honorable distinction for scientists at all career levels. With its "Starting Grants", the ERC aims to pave the way for excellent young scientists to pursue an independent career. This year, two scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) will receive the renowned grant: Pei-Chi Wei wants to investigate the role of DNA breaks in the development of the brain. Darjus Tschaharganeh plans to use the funds to decipher the significance of altered chromosome numbers in the development of cancer and cancer therapy.

Link to page: Joining efforts for better cancer care in Europe
International Conference

Joining efforts for better cancer care in Europe

Rising cancer incidence rates pose major challenges for Europe's healthcare systems. What can be done to improve cancer care in Europe? How can we ensure that people in all EU countries have equal access to innovative cancer medicine? What have we learned from the COVID-19 crisis to ensure the care of cancer patients during possible future pandemics? These questions were discussed by patients, politicians, scientists and physicians at the international expert meeting "Improving Cancer Care in Europe" organized by the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ) and the German Federal Ministry of Health in Heidelberg on September 3.

Link to page: Gene defect influences tumor development in childhood brain tumors
Latest News

Gene defect influences tumor development in childhood brain tumors

Medulloblastoma are the most common malignant brain tumors affecting children. The greatest danger is that the cancer cells can quickly spread to the surrounding tissues. Two genetic defects play a key role in the onset of these tumors, as scientists at the Hopp Children's Cancer Center Heidelberg (KiTZ), the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the National Institute of Neuroscience in Tokyo have discovered. The aim is for the findings to help scientists develop personalized treatment strategies for young patients.

Link to page: A metabolic enzyme as a potential new target for cancer immune therapies
Latest News

A metabolic enzyme as a potential new target for cancer immune therapies

The metabolic enzyme IL4I1 (Interleukin-4-Induced-1) promotes the spread of tumor cells and suppresses the immune system. This was discovered by scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the Berlin Institute of Health (BIH). The enzyme that activates the dioxin receptor is produced in large quantities by tumor cells. In the future, substances that inhibit IL4I1 could open up new opportunities for cancer therapy. The scientists have now published their results in the journal Cell.

Cancer in the EU

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