Link to page: Supposedly "silent" mutation with serious consequences
DKTK Essen

Supposedly "silent" mutation with serious consequences

So-called silent mutations have no effect on the composition of a protein. They are therefore not considered to promote cancer. However, scientists from the German Consortium for Translational Cancer Research (DKTK), partner site Essen, now describe in a case of kidney cancer an overlooked silent mutation with a major impact on prognosis.

Link to page: Lengthening of telomeres promotes relapse
Disease progression in childhood cancer:

Lengthening of telomeres promotes relapse

Neuroblastoma can spread relentlessly or shrink spontaneously. Scientists from the Hopp Children's Cancer Center Heidelberg (KiTZ), the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), the University of Heidelberg and the National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT) Heidelberg have shown that some malignant neuroblastomas employ a trick to avoid cell death: they use a special mechanism to lengthen the telomeres at the end of their chromosomes. This makes them very different from other high-risk neuroblastomas and those with a favorable prognosis. The results may help to provide new therapy concepts tailored to this subgroup.

Link to page: Year in Review
2020

Year in Review

Explore the highlights and challenges we experienced in 2020 in various video clips or in the image gallery and take a look at what is planned for 2021.

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Link to page: PSMA-binding agents: versatile against prostate cancer
DKTK Freiburg

PSMA-binding agents: versatile against prostate cancer

PSMA-binding agents specifically dock onto prostate cancer cells. Coupled to diagnostic or therapeutic radionuclides, they can improve the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. Scientists from the DKTK partner site in Freiburg, together with scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, have now used STED microscopy to investigate for the first time how these substances are taken up by the cell and distributed intracellularly.

Link to page: Are you considering a career as a Clinician Scientist?
Deadline 15 March 2021

Are you considering a career as a Clinician Scientist?

Apply for a prestigious two-year DKFZ Clinician Scientist Fellowship! More information here!

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Link to page: Possible gain in life years plus cost savings
Vitamin D supplementation:

Possible gain in life years plus cost savings

In recent years, three meta-analyses of clinical studies have come to the conclusion that vitamin D supplementation was associated with a reduction in the mortality rate from cancer of around 13 percent. Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now transferred these results to the situation in Germany and calculated: If all Germans over the age of 50 were to take vitamin D supplements, up to 30,000 cancer deaths per year could possibly be avoided and more than 300,000 years of life could be gained - in addition, health care costs could be saved.

Link to page: Epigenetic reprogramming turns neural stem cells into drivers of childhood brain tumors
A defect with serious consequences:

Epigenetic reprogramming turns neural stem cells into drivers of childhood brain tumors

During embryonic brain development, neural stem cells pass through a series of strictly regulated development phases. A mutation in a protein that packs our neatly folded DNA in the cell nucleus disrupts this timetable. Early precursor cells can then turn into particularly aggressive childhood brain tumors, known as brain stem gliomas. The cells acquire their cancer-driving characteristics as a result of epigenetic reprogramming – a process described by scientists at the Hopp Children's Cancer Center Heidelberg (KiTZ), the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) and Stanford University in California.

Link to page: How blood stem cells maintain their lifelong potential for self-renewal
Latest News

How blood stem cells maintain their lifelong potential for self-renewal

A characteristic feature of all stem cells is their ability to self-renew. But how is this potential maintained throughout life? Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the Heidelberg Institute for Stem Cell Technology and Experimental Medicine* (HI-STEM) have now discovered in mice that cells in the so-called "stem cell niche" are responsible for this: Blood vessel cells of the niche produce a factor that stimulates blood stem cells and thus maintains their self-renewal capacity. With the decades of life, the production of this factor ceases and blood stem cells begin to age.

Link to page: DKFZ and EMBL intensify cooperation
Latest News

DKFZ and EMBL intensify cooperation

The development of new strategies for processing and analysing life science data, the further development of scientific imaging, the search for new active substances for drugs: These are the tasks that the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) want to tackle together in the future. The two research institutions, which are among the international leaders in their fields, have now signed a joint Memorandum of Understanding to intensify their cooperation.

Cancer in the EU

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