2018 Erwin Schrödinger Prize

Enhanced detection and treatment of prostate cancer

This year's Stifterverband Science Award – Erwin Schrödinger Prize goes to an interdisciplinary team of researchers from Heidelberg. Scientists Matthias Eder, Michael Eisenhut, Uwe Haberkorn and Klaus Kopka have jointly developed a method that facilitates more reliable diagnosis as well as more specific treatment of prostate cancer.

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Sugar metabolism controls intestinal regeneration

Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center and Heidelberg University have discovered a surprising connection between sugar metabolism and the adaptation of intestinal tissue to the nutritional state.

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Latest News

A healthy lifestyle reduces the risk of colon cancer - regardless of the genetic risk profile

The risk of developing bowel cancer depends, among other things, on lifestyle. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center were able to show that everyone can reduce their personal risk of colon cancer by combining as many of five healthy lifestyles as possible: non-smoking, low alcohol consumption, a healthy diet, sufficient physical activity and normal body weight. This applies regardless of the genetic risk of bowel cancer. Even those who have a slightly increased risk due to genetic factors can reduce their risk by following a healthy lifestyle.

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Hopp Children’s Cancer Center (KiTZ)

New approach uncovers tumor promoting signaling pathway in common children’s brain tumor

A study conducted by researchers of the "Hopp-Children's Cancer Center at the NCT Heidelberg (KiTZ)" together with colleagues from the Institute Curie (Orsay, France) and the University Hospital Düsseldorf discovered a novel signal transducer promoting medulloblastoma growth. Here, the teams combined two state-of-the-art molecular analysis methods in a project supported by the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK). Their combination approach revealed novel therapeutic targets for a difficult-to-treat brain tumor in children.

DKTK

Colorectal cancer: Tipping the scales

Tumors of the colon are among the most prevalent cancers. Researchers at LMU and the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) have now shown that a protein promotes the formation of intestinal stem cells and thereby contributes to the initiation of tumorigenesis in the colon.

DKTK

microRNAs predict recurrence risk of head and neck tumors

A new method predicts the course of HPV-negative head and neck cancer after radiation chemotherapy. According to a recent article in the journal 'Clinical Cancer Research', five microRNAs (miRNAs) can provide the decisive data. The work was conducted at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the University Hospital of the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU) in close collaboration with the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK).

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Figures for Germany for the first time

Avoidable risk factors cause 37 percent of all cancer cases

How many cancer cases in Germany are attributable to risk factors that we can influence ourselves? How many cancer cases are linked to cigarette smoking, being overweight or physical inactivity and, thus, are potentially preventable? Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now calculated these figures for Germany for the first time. They will provide information for policy makers and medical professionals on how the potential of cancer prevention can be exploited more efficiently.

Award

Triple ERC success for DKFZ junior researchers

The European Research Council (ERC) awards Starting Grants to support excellent young scientists when they are starting an independent science career. In this year's round of proposals, three scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have been chosen at once for the prestigious award: Ana Bonito, Fabian Erdel and Moritz Mall.

"Immunology & Inflammation"

Joining forces for immune research

The initiative "Immunology & Inflammation" unifies efforts in immunological research within the Helmholtz Association. 23 working groups from five Helmholtz Centers are joining forces to address some of the most complex problems in today's immunology in ways that can only be explored in collaboration.

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