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Link to page: Kendra Maass receives 2022 CERN Robert Connor Dawes Scientific Fellowship Award
Hopp Children's Tumor Center Heidelberg

Kendra Maass receives 2022 CERN Robert Connor Dawes Scientific Fellowship Award

Kendra Maass, scientist at the Hopp Children's Tumor Center Heidelberg (KiTZ) and German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), has been awarded with the CERN Robert Connor Dawes Scientific Fellowship Award 2022. The grant is awarded by the National Brain Tumor Society and endowed with 100,000 US dollars. It allows Maass to accurately study the mass transfer of brain tumor cells in children.

Link to page: Are you considering a career as a Clinician Scientist?
Deadline 15 March 2022

Are you considering a career as a Clinician Scientist?

Apply for a prestigious two-year DKFZ Clinician Scientist Fellowship! More information here!

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Your Donation for Cancer Research
Link to page: A risk factor for early colorectal cancer
Obesity at a young age

A risk factor for early colorectal cancer

The incidence of colorectal cancers in young adults is increasing. At the same time, the proportion of overweight and obese young people is also on the rise. Whether there is a connection between these two observations, however, was not known until now. Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now shown that the risk of early colorectal cancer is significantly increased in overweight young people compared to normal-weight peers.

Link to page: Helmholtz Young Investigator Groups
Application Deadline: 14th February 2022

Helmholtz Young Investigator Groups

Interested in joining the DKFZ as a Junior Research Group Leader? Apply now!

Link to page: Algorithm identifies cancer drivers
Latest News

Algorithm identifies cancer drivers

Genetic alterations that promote the development and spread of tumors are difficult to identify. This is especially true for mutations in the non-protein-coding regions of the genome, which include all important regulatory sequences. Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center have now published an algorithm that detects cancer drivers in both the protein-coding and non-coding regions of the genome.

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Link to page: WHO publishes first classification of childhood tumors
Hopp Children’s Cancer Center Heidelberg

WHO publishes first classification of childhood tumors

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), an agency of the World Health Organization (WHO), will soon publish the first edition of its classification of childhood cancers. The new WHO classification forms the basis of modern, precise cancer diagnostics for physicians and pediatric oncologists worldwide and is based on the latest international research findings, including those from the Hopp Children's Cancer Centre Heidelberg (KiTZ), the German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Heidelberg University Hospital (UKHD) and many other pathological and pediatric oncology centers worldwide. The most important findings and principles of the first reference work of childhood tumors have now been published.

Link to page: Özlem Türeci appointed new Professor of Personalized Immunotherapy at HI-TRON Mainz
Latest News

Özlem Türeci appointed new Professor of Personalized Immunotherapy at HI-TRON Mainz

The world-renowned immunologist, cancer researcher, and entrepreneur Özlem Türeci has accepted the professorship of Personalized Immunotherapy at the Mainz University Medical Center and the Helmholtz Institute for Translational Oncology (HI-TRON) Mainz, which was founded in 2019. HI-TRON is a partnership between the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and a subsidiary of the Mainz University Medical Center, TRON gGmbH, along with the Mainz University Medical Center and the University of Mainz. The aim of this collaboration is to develop effective immunotherapies and to identify new biomarkers for treatment.

Link to page: Moderate immune response is more effective against leukemia
Latest News

Moderate immune response is more effective against leukemia

The development of immunotherapies against blood cancer could be more successful if T cells are activated moderately rather than excessively. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center have now been able to show this in mice: If the researchers blocked a cytokine that slows down the immune system, the T cells became exhausted and failed in the fight against leukemia.

Link to page: Tracking down resistant cancer cells
Latest News

Tracking down resistant cancer cells

In multiple myeloma, a cancer of the bone marrow, relapse almost always occurs after treatment. Initially, most patients respond well to therapy. However, as the disease progresses, resistant cancer cells spread in the bone marrow, with fatal consequences for the patients. Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg University Hospital (UKHD) and the National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT) in Heidelberg have now used single-cell sequencing to elucidate how myeloma cells with different genetic characteristics change in interaction with the surrounding immune cells in a patient during relapse. The results point to new approaches to counteract relapse.

Cancer in the EU

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