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Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry

Prof. Dr. Klaus Kopka

Two radiopharmaceuticals, [18F]FDG and [18F]FLT, showing as an example for molecular imaging a patient with an oropharynx CA. The differences of physiological uptake in brain (FDG) and bone marrow (FLT) are noteworthy.
Vergrößerte Ansicht Two radiopharmaceuticals, [18F]FDG and [18F]FLT, showing as an example for molecular imaging a patient with an oropharynx CA. The differences of physiological uptake in brain (FDG) and bone marrow (FLT) are noteworthy.

Research at the Department of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry is focussed at the development of new pharmaceuticals, which have potential for molecular imaging and therapy of tumors. Tumor-specific carrier molecules are labeled with radioisotopes leading to targeted accumulation in cancer cells. These Radiopharmaceuticals serve as molecular probes for positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). Radiopharmaceuticals provide information on functional and structural properties of organs and tumors, on pathological changes in tissues, on perfusion dynamics in diseased organs, on local distribution, availability, and effect of drugs, and on the time course of various therapy procedures, their consequences and benefits. Radiopharmaceuticals provide information about the localization of tumors as well as the function of various organs. In addition information about distribution, availability and efficacy of drugs can be monitored to visualize the effectiveness of therapy. In nuclear medicine several radiopharmaceuticals are successfully applied for internal radiotherapy. In addition to own research the department provides radiopharmaceuticals for the support of the patient care at the Clinical Cooperation Unit – Nuclear Medicine (E060). Necessary requirements for clinical applications are the maintenance of GMP-conform production and the documentation for the pharmaceutical inspection control.

Development of novel radiopharmaceuticals:
Urea derived PSMA inhibitors for the imaging and therapy of prostate cancer.
Radiopharmaceuticals for the therapy related imaging of apoptosis and necrosis.


Radiopharmacy:
Extension of GMP facility.

Selected Publications

Afshar-Oromieh, A., Malcher, A., Eder, M., Eisenhut, M., Linhart, H. G., Hadaschik, B. A., Holland-Letz, T., Giesel, F. L., Kratochwil, C., Haufe, S., Haberkorn, U., and Zechmann, C. M. (2013) PET imaging with a [68Ga]Gallium-labelled PSMA ligand for the diagnosis of prostate cancer: biodistribution in humans and first evaluation of tumour lesions. Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 40, 486-95.

Eder, M., Schafer, M., Bauder-Wust, U., Hull, W. E., Wangler, C., Mier, W., Haberkorn, U., and Eisenhut, M. (2012) 68Ga-Complex Lipophilicity and the Targeting Property of a Urea-Based PSMA Inhibitor for PET Imaging. Bioconjugate Chem 23, 688-97.

Hennrich, U., Seyler, L., Schäfer, M., Bauder-Wüst, U., Eisenhut, M., Semmler, W., Bäuerle, T. (2012) Synthesis and in vitro evaluation of 68Ga-DOTA-4-FBn-TN14003 – a novel tracer for the imaging of CXCR4 expression. Bioorg Med Chem 20, 1502-1510.

Kubas H, Schäfer M, Bauder-Wüst U, Eder M, Oltmanns D, Haberkorn U, Mier W, Eisenhut M. (2010) Multivalent Cyclic RGD-Ligands: Influence of Linker Lengths on Receptor Binding. Nucl Med Biol 37, 885–891.

last update: 19/06/2013 back to top